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Upcoming Events and Exhibits


Events


Public Forums on Humanities Research Bridge

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. November 14, Memorial Library Room 231
2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. November 29, Memorial Library Room 126
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. December 8, Memorial Library Room 126

Members of the UW-Madison community are invited to participate in a public forum about the new Humanities Research Bridge, which will support innovative collaborative efforts such as Project Bamboo.


Steenbock Library and F.H. King Students for Sustainable Agriculture Film Screening & Discussion

"The Greenhorns" film screening & discussion
Tuesday, November 29th
12:00 - 1:30pm, November 29, Steenbock Library Room 340 (film scheduled to start at 12:15, followed by discussion)


From the film's press release:

"The Greenhorns" documents the decisive reemergence on our national landscape of a key cultural and economic force, the young American farmer. These new men and women in agriculture operate and thrive despite a longstanding trend of farmer attrition and aging, and the continued rapid loss of farmland to development.  The average age of a farmer in America is 57, and USDA subsidies to huge agribusinesses dominate Farm bill spending. But many communities are experiencing a resurgence of activity among young, new and aspiring farmers.

“The Greenhorns” shows how a new generation of young agrarians who farm with their brains as well as their bodies exert a promising and necessary impact against these crises. These greenhorns are working to reverse negative trends in favor of healthy food, local and regional foodsheds, and the revitalization of rural economies, one farm at a time. Official mandates calling for the increase and successful resettlement of young farmers stir hope while farmland remains abundant, if difficult to access for most new entrants. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s recent call for 100,000 new farmers is an encouraging sign. Now we need policies to back up that goal. With over 400 million acres of farmland poised to change hands over the next twenty years, the time for action is NOW. The 2012 Farm Bill package of legislation is already in the pipeline. The Greenhorns film sets this context, shows the issues, and introduces the viewer to a savvy, purposeful posse of young farmers getting into the business of fixing America. One farmer at a time.


The Mellon Workshop on Science & Print Culture Presents a Concert in Special Collections

Thursday, December 1
4:30 p.m., Department of Special Collections, Memorial Library

The Mellon Workshop on Science & Print Culture presents "Kircher's Rome: Music in the 17th-century Collegio Romano" as performed by Eliza's Toyes on Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 4:30 pm, Special Collections, 9th floor of Memorial Library.

This program reflects vocal and instrumental music one might have heard in the Society of Jesus' college in seventeenth-century Rome. Professor of mathematics at the Collegio Romano and polymath, Athanasius Kircher mentioned these composers in his Musurgia Universalis (1650), a monumental encyclopedia of musical history, theory, and practice. The concert takes place in the exhibit area of Special Collections on the 9th floor of Memorial Library, where the current exhibit, "Jesuits and the Construction of Knowledge, 1540-1773," highlights (among other topics) Jesuit interest in musical theory and practice and includes a copy of Kircher's Musurgia (1650).

For more information about the program, please see the news release about the event.


Submission Deadline, "Our Nations of Others": Creative Reactions to Enrique's Journey

January 13, 2012

The University of Wisconsin-Madison common-reading program, Go Big Read, is pleased to invite all UW-Madison students, staff, faculty, and Dane County residents, to submit a creative piece in reaction to the reading of the book Enrique's Journey to compete in the juried exhibit Our Nations of Others.

For complete submission guidelines and information, please visit the Go Big Read site.

Exhibits


Ebling Library for the Health Sciences Exhibit: "Seaworthy: A History of Maritime Health and Medicine"


September 28, 2011 through January 31, 2012
3rd floor Historical Reading Room & Galleries

"Seaworthy" is an examination of subjects such as scurvy, horseshoe crabs, the Middle Passage, SCUBA, Caisson disease, the health of emigrants, desalination, sea sickness, shipwrecks, whaling and the health of seamen across the ages. Supported by books, journals and magazines from Ebling's Rare Books and Special Collections and materials from other campus libraries. Reception and discussion with Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, Karen Jacobsen and oceanographer, Cindy Lee Van Dover on Friday, November 11th from 3:00-6:00 at Ebling.

This exhibit complements the following exhibit, to also be displayed at Ebling Library for the Health Sciences September 28, 2011 through January 31, 2012, 3rd floor Historical Reading Room and Galleries:

"Beyond the Edge of the Sea: Diversity of Life in the Deep-Ocean Wilderness"

This traveling exhibit from The College of William & Mary's Muscarelle Museum of Art features the magnificent watercolors of expeditionary illustrator Karen Jacobsen. Jacobsen spent a two year period in the Alvin submersible, with oceanographer Cindy Lee Van Dover at the helm, exploring the deep ocean and rendering these wonderful works of art.

More information regarding both of these exhibits can be found on the Ebling Library website.


Special Collections Exhibit: "Jesuits and the Construction of Knowledge, 1540–1773"

early October through December 2011
976 Memorial Library

As missionaries, scholars, teachers, authors, and members of learned academies, members of the Society of Jesus exerted great influence on early modern European learning. The exhibit will show illustrated works by Jesuit authors, and explore their role in the construction of knowledge from the establishment of the Society of Jesus in 1540 through its papal suppression in 1773. The books feature intriguing illustrations ranging from scientific diagrams and maps to natural history illustrations and ethnographic representations. The exhibit, a collaboration undertaken by Forence Hsia, James Lattis, Robin Rider, and Meridith Beck Sayre, complements a digital humanities project under way in the Libraries aimed at constructing a searchable database of early modern Jesuit iconography pertaining to scholarship and travel.


Kohler Art Library Exhibit: "Listen, Listen: Adadam Agofomma: a fine-press book by Take Time Press"

November 1 through December 31, 2011
Kohler Art Library

The inaugural publication of Take Time Press, “Listen, Listen: Adadam Agofamma,” was designed and produced by Mary Hark, a textile artist and papermaker in the UW-Madison Design Studies Department (School of Human Ecology).  The exquisite handmade book celebrates the legacy of Koo Nimo, a Ghanian Palm Wine musician.  Through the use of paper samples, plant materials, photographs, and other material, this exhibit documents the book’s production and artistic process.

This exhibit is part of a larger series of events presented by the UW-Madison Design Gallery: “Look, Look, Listen, Listen: Celebrating the Arts of Ghana.”  The other events include two exhibitions at the Commonwealth Gallery (Tradition & Innovation: Batik yardage by Dorothy Akpene Amenuke, Adinka cloth from the Boakye Family Workshop; and Place to Place: Recent paintings and prints by Atta Kwami and Pamela Clarkson) as well as a concert at the UW-Madison Music Hall (Koo Nimo: in concert with Atimevu Drum and Dance Ensemble).  For more information about these events, see:  www.designgallery.wisc.edu.



"If minds are truly alive they will seek out books, for books are the human race recounting its memorable experiences, confronting its problems, searching for solutions, drawing the blueprints of its futures."

Harry A. Overstreet (1875-1970), American social psychologist


For more information about events in the UW-Madison Libraries, contact:


Library Communications
372K Memorial Library
728 State St.
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-2566
or
e-mail Library Communications

Full Exhibits Calendar

Special Collections Exhibit: "Reflections of Anglo-Saxon England"

through September 2011
976 Memorial Library

The exhibit explores the history, artifacts, and myths of Anglo-Saxon England and their many political and cultural uses. Featuring printed books from the sixteenth century through the present, the exhibit was designed to complement the biennial conference of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists held in Madison in summer 2011. Books on display will highlight reflections of (and on) Anglo-Saxon England, including renderings of language of the period, depictions of archeological finds, chronicles of Christianization, and accounts (whether sober or fanciful) of customs, dress, and battles.


Ebling Library for the Health Sciences Exhibit: "Seaworthy: A History of Maritime Health and Medicine"

September 28, 2011 through January 31, 2012
3rd floor Historical Reading Room & Galleries

"Seaworthy" is an examination of subjects such as scurvy, horseshoe crabs, the Middle Passage, SCUBA, Caisson disease, the health of emigrants, desalination, sea sickness, shipwrecks, whaling and the health of seamen across the ages. Supported by books, journals and magazines from Ebling's Rare Books and Special Collections and materials from other campus libraries. Reception and discussion with Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, Karen Jacobsen and oceanographer, Cindy Lee Van Dover on Friday, November 11th from 3:00-6:00 at Ebling.

This exhibit complements the following exhibit, to also be displayed at Ebling Library for the Health Sciences September 28, 2011 through January 31, 2012, 3rd floor Historical Reading Room and Galleries:

"Beyond the Edge of the Sea: Diversity of Life in the Deep-Ocean Wilderness"

This traveling exhibit from The College of William & Mary's Muscarelle Museum of Art features the magnificent watercolors of expeditionary illustrator Karen Jacobsen. Jacobsen spent a two year period in the Alvin submersible, with oceanographer Cindy Lee Van Dover at the helm, exploring the deep ocean and rendering these wonderful works of art.

More information regarding both of these exhibits can be found on the Ebling Library website.


Special Collections Exhibit: "Jesuits and the Construction of Knowledge, 1540–1773"

early October through December 2011
976 Memorial Library

As missionaries, scholars, teachers, authors, and members of learned academies, members of the Society of Jesus exerted great influence on early modern European learning. The exhibit will show illustrated works by Jesuit authors, and explore their role in the construction of knowledge from the establishment of the Society of Jesus in 1540 through its papal suppression in 1773. The books feature intriguing illustrations ranging from scientific diagrams and maps to natural history illustrations and ethnographic representations. The exhibit, a collaboration undertaken by Forence Hsia, James Lattis, Robin Rider, and Meridith Beck Sayre, complements a digital humanities project under way in the Libraries aimed at constructing a searchable database of early modern Jesuit iconography pertaining to scholarship and travel.


Kohler Art Library Exhibit: "Listen, Listen: Adadam Agofomma: a fine-press book by Take Time Press"

November 1 through December 31, 2011
Kohler Art Library

The inaugural publication of Take Time Press, “Listen, Listen: Adadam Agofamma,” was designed and produced by Mary Hark, a textile artist and papermaker in the UW-Madison Design Studies Department (School of Human Ecology).  The exquisite handmade book celebrates the legacy of Koo Nimo, a Ghanian Palm Wine musician.  Through the use of paper samples, plant materials, photographs, and other material, this exhibit documents the book’s production and artistic process.

This exhibit is part of a larger series of events presented by the UW-Madison Design Gallery: “Look, Look, Listen, Listen: Celebrating the Arts of Ghana.”  The other events include two exhibitions at the Commonwealth Gallery (Tradition & Innovation: Batik yardage by Dorothy Akpene Amenuke, Adinka cloth from the Boakye Family Workshop; and Place to Place: Recent paintings and prints by Atta Kwami and Pamela Clarkson) as well as a concert at the UW-Madison Music Hall (Koo Nimo: in concert with Atimevu Drum and Dance Ensemble).  For more information about these events, see:  www.designgallery.wisc.edu.



Full Events Calendar

Friends Fall Lecture

Thursday, September 22, 4:30 p.m.
Room 126, Memorial Library

Deborah Blum, a professor in the UW–Madison School of Journalism, will present a lecture entitled "Cyanide and Cocktails." Blum is the author of the New York Times bestseller, The Poisoner's Handbook. She will tell the story of how a pair of scientists in Prohibition-era New York City tackled murderers, big corporations, and the U.S. government in their determination to catch killers, solve chemical mysteries, and build a new science of toxicology. Their work ushered in the CSI-forensics era that is seen today and changed the way chemistry is viewed in our modern culture. Blum, a Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist, is the author of four previous books, a past president of the National Association of Science Writers, and a professor of journalism at the University of WisconsinMadison.


FELIX: A Series of New Writing

Thursday, October 6, 4:30 p.m.
Room 126, Memorial Library

Patrick F. Durgin is the author of Pundits Scribes Pupils (Potes & Poets, 1998), And so on (Texture Press, 1999), Sorter (Duration Press, 2001), Color Music (Cuneiform Press, 2002), Imitation Poems (Atticus / Finch, 2006), and The Route (with Jen Hofer, Atelos, 20078). His poetry and critical writings have appeared in numerous small-press periodicals since the late 90s. Durgin has published articles and interviews on a number of contemporary poets and has translated excerpts of the French poet Jérôme Bertin's long work, "x.x.n." He is editor and publisher of Kenning Editions, and is on the faculty at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Kent Johnson is a poet, translator, and editor. His poetry, translations, and criticism have been published widely, adn his recent translations of the Bolivian poet Jamie Saenz helped him to earn a NEA Literature Fellowship in Translation, one of the most sought-after grants in poetry and fiction. Kent teaches English and Spanish at Highland Community College in northwest Illinois, where he is a co-faculty advisor of the literary and arts publication The Prairie Wind.


Friends of the Libraries Semiannual Book Sale

Wednesday–Saturday, October 19–22
116 Memorial Library

The largest used-book sale in Wisconsin includes literature, history, children's books, science, art, philosophy, reference texts, foreign language books, and more. Videos, DVDs, CDs, and LPs are available. All sales are open to the public.

The hours are:

Wednesday, October 19
Preview Sale: 5–9 p.m. ($5 entry)

Thursday and Friday, October 20–21
Regular Sale: 10:30 a.m.–7 p.m. (no entry fee)

Saturday, October 22
Bag Sale: 10:30 a.m.–1 p.m. ($3 per bag)
Bring your own grocery bag or purchase one for $1
1:05–2 p.m.: remaining books are free


FELIX: A Series of New Writing

Thursday, November 3, 4:30 p.m.
Room 126, Memorial Library


Charles Alexander, poet, publisher, and book artist, is the director and editor in chief of Chax Press, specializing in innovative poetry and the book arts. He studied bookmaking with Walter Hamady at UWMadison. Recent poetry books include Four Ninety Eight to Seven (Meow Press, 1996), Etudes: D & D (Quarry Press, 1997), near or random acts (Singing Horse Press, 2004), and Certain Slants (Junction Press, 2007). He is also the editor of Talking the Boundless Book (1995), a collection of essays on the book arts.

Susan M. Schultz is a poet, critic, publisher, and professor of English at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Her writings include the poetry collections Aleatory Allegories (Salt, 2000), Memory Cards & Adoption Papers (Potes & Poets, 2001), and And then something happened (Salt, 2004). Schultz is the founder of Tinfish Press, which publishes experimental poetry from the Pacific region.


Steenbock Library and F.H. King Students for Sustainable Agriculture Film Screening & Discussion

"The Greenhorns" film screening & discussion
Tuesday, November 29th
12:00 - 1:30pm, November 29, Steenbock Library Room 340 (film scheduled to start at 12:15, followed by discussion)


From the film's press release:

"The Greenhorns" documents the decisive reemergence on our national landscape of a key cultural and economic force, the young American farmer. These new men and women in agriculture operate and thrive despite a longstanding trend of farmer attrition and aging, and the continued rapid loss of farmland to development.  The average age of a farmer in America is 57, and USDA subsidies to huge agribusinesses dominate Farm bill spending. But many communities are experiencing a resurgence of activity among young, new and aspiring farmers.

“The Greenhorns” shows how a new generation of young agrarians who farm with their brains as well as their bodies exert a promising and necessary impact against these crises. These greenhorns are working to reverse negative trends in favor of healthy food, local and regional foodsheds, and the revitalization of rural economies, one farm at a time. Official mandates calling for the increase and successful resettlement of young farmers stir hope while farmland remains abundant, if difficult to access for most new entrants. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack’s recent call for 100,000 new farmers is an encouraging sign. Now we need policies to back up that goal. With over 400 million acres of farmland poised to change hands over the next twenty years, the time for action is NOW. The 2012 Farm Bill package of legislation is already in the pipeline. The Greenhorns film sets this context, shows the issues, and introduces the viewer to a savvy, purposeful posse of young farmers getting into the business of fixing America. One farmer at a time.


The Mellon Workshop on Science & Print Culture Presents a Concert in Special Collections

Thursday, December 1
4:30 p.m., Department of Special Collections, Memorial Library

The Mellon Workshop on Science & Print Culture presents "Kircher's Rome: Music in the 17th-century Collegio Romano" as performed by Eliza's Toyes on Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 4:30 pm, Special Collections, 9th floor of Memorial Library.

This program reflects vocal and instrumental music one might have heard in the Society of Jesus' college in seventeenth-century Rome. Professor of mathematics at the Collegio Romano and polymath, Athanasius Kircher mentioned these composers in his Musurgia Universalis (1650), a monumental encyclopedia of musical history, theory, and practice. The concert takes place in the exhibit area of Special Collections on the 9th floor of Memorial Library, where the current exhibit, "Jesuits and the Construction of Knowledge, 1540-1773," highlights (among other topics) Jesuit interest in musical theory and practice and includes a copy of Kircher's Musurgia (1650).

For more information about the program, please see the news release about the event.



"If minds are truly alive they will seek out books, for books are the human race recounting its memorable experiences, confronting its problems, searching for solutions, drawing the blueprints of its futures."

Harry A. Overstreet (1875-1970), American social psychologist


For more information about events in the UW-Madison Libraries, contact:


Library Communications
372K Memorial Library
728 State St.
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 262-2566
or
e-mail Library Communications

 

Ongoing Workshops

Library Workshops
Library staff members conduct workshops throughout the year at no charge for UW-Madison faculty, staff and students. Program topics range from using the library catalog and conducting research in specialized databases to finding grant information and creating simple Web pages. Contact Library & Information Literacy Instruction at 262-4308 for more information or visit the Web site.

 

Friends Book Sale

The largest used book sale in Wisconsin will be held Wednesday, October 19 through Saturday, October 22, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Memorial Library in room 116. The sale includes more than 15,000 books covering a wide range of subjects.

The semiannual sale, organized by the Friends of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Library, helps to support the Friends and the Libraries. Among other things, the sales help fund an annual lecture series and other special events, special purchases for the library collections, preservation of special materials, and grants for a visiting scholar support program.

Nearly 60 volunteers coordinate the event that draws students, faculty and visitors from around the Midwest. Books for the sale are donated primarily by University of Wisconsin faculty, staff, students, and Madison-area residents.

The sale is free (except the preview sale) and open to the public.

Preview sales are held on the Wednesday before a scheduled sale, and require a $5 admission fee. Regular sales have no admission fee and run Thursday through Saturday, with the Saturday sale offering books at $3 per bag (bring your own bag).

Fall 2011 Book Sale Hours

Wednesday, October 19
Preview Sale: 5–9 p.m. ($5 entry)

Thursday and Friday, October 20–21
Regular Sale: 10:30 a.m.–7 p.m. (no entry fee)

Saturday, October 22
Bag Sale: 10:30 a.m.–1 p.m. ($3 per bag)
Bring your own grocery bag or purchase one for $1
1:05–2 p.m.: remaining books are free

For more information about the Friends book sale, please visit the Friends website.

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